THE VITRUVIAN WOMAN

4/14/2017

Civilizations that have any kind of perception in the sciences and arts are familiar with Leonardo da Vinci’s drawing of THE VITRUVIAN MAN. This famous work, completed in the 1490’s, was his rendition of an ancient architect’s (Vitruvius) quest for the ideal man’s relationship through proportions with the universe and his surroundings. Assisted by the work of Giacomo Andrea, da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man’s relationship with the universe (the circle) is based on his outstretched arms even with the top of his head and his legs spread apart to reduce his height by 1/14th, thus generating the circle created by his fingers and toes. The center of this circle is his navel. Superimposed on this figure is the same man standing erect with arms perpendicular to the torso. Centered in a square (representing the man’s world) outlined by the fingers, toes and the top of the head, the center line for this figure passes through the root of his penis. So, a universal constant exists in the space between the navel (a representation of where he came from) and the root of his penis (a representation of where he is going), i.e., his seed. This 2-dimensional figure eloquently diatribes man’s harmony in nature. In women, with the vagina pointing down, the opening generates a square centered from the cervical opening perpendicular to the circle (2 dimensions), generated by her navel, and thus generates a third dimension. This difference explains the vast dissimilarities between men and women. Women are deep and men are shallow. Women are from Venus, shrouded in a mysterious, unfathomable atmosphere; and men are from Mars, the simple red disk representing war. Wiring a 3-dimensional brain creates emotion. Wiring a 2-dimensional brain creates simple motion (humping). Emotion creates a need for something dear. Motion only requires a need for beer. Final proof: a man can be represented by a straight-lined stick figure, a woman requires 2 curves for the boobs, an extra dimension. 

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