THE GREAT LAKES OF IOWA

6/18/2020

Butting up to the Minnesota/Iowa border and 75 miles east of the South Dakota/Iowa border are a string of 14,000-year-old glacier lakes nestled into the prairie bleakness, like blue sapphires in a bushel of corn. Remnants of the Wisconsin Glacier that left behind over 10,000 lakes in Minnesota and dispersing 34 into the northern part of Iowa, these kettle and scoured out lakes are a scenic savior for the rolling prairies of the Midwest. The deepest is known as West Okoboji Lake, and is a fashion runway for capitalist excess. Lining the shores are million dollar plus homes, sporting $100,000 boats, and an amusement park to entertain the little tykes who don’t quite fathom money yet. A typical American contest that competes one loan against another to try and keep up with the Vain and Flamboyant Joneses. Employing hundreds of skilled people landscaping and building excessive structures out of wood, the American dream consists of taking the most productive years of one’s life to build a high maintenance temple to one’s accomplishments. As the finished structure is shellacked and stuccoed, and stuck out in the elements to immediately start to deteriorate, human goals are misdirected. Had all this energy and funds been directed at human suffering, the net worth of all those homes would have surely made a difference in the lives of some misfortunates. But this is not how Western Capitalism works. The rich like to erect monuments to themselves on a foundation of poor people, and the poor are happy being the rubble of which the elite stand on. In March of 1857, a group of starving and freezing Sioux braves saw fit to slaughter 30 plus settlers in the cabins they had built for themselves in the Great Lakes of Iowa. Many factors were at work that fateful week that created those atrocities, but without deceit, disguise, and lies, peppered with greed, it is highly likely that those lineages that were killed then would have survived, and thrived, today. 

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