TIT FOR TAT

7/4/2021

The English language is no different than any other human language that was ever spoken and then recorded in a written form; in time, some mistakes are guaranteed. The phrase was first recorded around 1558 and the original saying was: tip for tap, which are both English words for light hits. It, thus, translates to blow for blow or a strategy that specifies that if 1 party does something offensive to a second party, that person will retaliate in a like manner. It is an expression similar to: an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth. It quantifies fairness in a dispute as compared to an emotional overreaction to an aggressive situation. Examples of such would be: slap for souffle, which signifies that a hit to the face with an open hand is met with a severe beating that liquifies the internal organs. A slight unfairness in the outcome. Another would be: pinch for pulping. Placing the thumb and a finger around a small section of your opponent’s skin and squeezing until a slight pain sensation is induced, is now met with retaliation by throwing the pincher into some godawful mechanical machinery that crushes wood fibers into a slurry that will form paper. Again, another radical response that goes off the charts. The current times have generated the expression: BBs for ballistics. This means a small altercation with a BB gun by 1 country is met with a full out launch of nuclear Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles by another. And again, this is an absurd reaction. Looking back to the original saying of: tit for tat, 1 can see that it wasn’t just a spelling error but was an expression about dating.  The male attempts to go down 3 levels on the female: the 1st is the mouth, next is the breasts, and the 3rd is the vagina. This expression is about the 2nd level, where the female will surrender the fat pillows for a good movie, a decent dinner, and some expensive wine. The correct expression is: tit for dat; and again, as stated, spelling mistakes are guaranteed. 

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