CHESS

5/18/2018

A strategy board game thought to have originated from India 1500 years ago was called Chaturanga, which translates to 4 divisions. This is in reference to the bishop(elephantry), knight(calvary), rook(chariotry), and pawn(infantry) whose purpose is to protect their own king through defensive measures and capture the enemy king through offensive measures. It is in short, WAR. It was transferred to Persia through trade and picked up by the Islamic Arabs after they defeated the Persians in 633CE. By 1000 CE, it had made its way into the Iberian Peninsula and spread throughout Europe after that. Current estimates for chess players in the world are 8.6% of the total population. Estimates for eligible adults playing MODERN CHESS is around 90%. This variant uses strategies from conventional chess but is not limited to a 64 square board with preselected pieces. This version’s goal is to capture a long-term mate or to “check” out a one-night stand for a short-term pleasure. The king and queen are the essence of the individual game player representing both sexes combined within that person, one dominant and one suppressed. The flexible Queen is the most versatile and the short-ranged King is the most important. Loss of the King in the individual results in a lone, crazy woman and it’s game over. Surrounding these 2 key pieces is a bevy of allies to accomplish these goals. The rooks, knights, and bishops are the thought processes that comprise cunning, charm, and deception. The 8 ordinary pawns represent the 8 human emotions. They are anger, anticipation, disgust, fear, joy, sadness, surprise, and trust. Combining all 11 tactics produces an interesting game for the players and, after many moves, sex may occur. Complex Human Emotions in Search of Sex (CHESS) is the procreation drive built into all of us. We live on through our seeds. In the game of CHESS, in order for one opponent to win, the other must lose or else it’s a “stale” mate. 

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